Courses

 

The 2022-2023 course offerings applicable to a Specialist, Major, or Minor degree in Jewish Studies are now posted on the webpage below! Visit the Faculty of Arts and Science Course Timetable to see all course offerings for the 2022-2023 academic year. 

 

As more information on course listings becomes available, we will continue to update our handbook and website. Please find our undergraduate course handbook here: PDF iconATCJS 2022-23 Undergraduate Course Handbook.pdf

Course offerings vary each year, especially for Special Topics Courses. Visit the course archives to see previous editions of the Undergraduate Handbook and to get a better idea of what has been offered in the past, and how you might build your program. 

See more details regarding enrolment instructions

CJS Courses for 2022/23

CJS200H1-S - Introduction to Jewish Thought

Wednesday 10 - 12 pm 

Instructors: Michael Rosenthal and Sol Goldberg 

It is hard to be a Jew, but the difficulties make for interesting questions. Does God exist? How is God revealed to Moses at Sinai and to the prophets? Are there such things as miracles? Are we free to follow what God commands? What is the nature of faith? If God is good, then why do bad things happen to innocent people? Is faith possible after the Holocaust? What is the role of Israel in modern Jewish life? Who belongs to the Jewish community? How do Jews address inequality and discrimination? How do Jews understand a good and meaningful life? Professors Goldberg and Rosenthal invite students to join them in debating the answers to these questions and others.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) 


CJS201H1F - Introduction to Jewish Culture 

Thursday 10 - 12 am 

Instructors: TBA

General introduction to history, literatures and cultures of Jewish people from antiquity to contemporary. A balanced presentation of multi-disciplinary approaches and multi-methodological approaches to Jewish studies, with a special emphasis on Jewish cultural studies and Jewish secularity.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


CJS290H1F - The Image in Holocaust Memory

Wednesday 10 - 12 pm 

Instructor: Virginia Shewfelt

This course will focus on how visual media, such as photographs, television programming, film, and comics have shaped popular understandings of the Holocaust. Visual media was used both during the Holocaust to record events as they occurred, and in subsequent decades to communicate these events to a wider audience. Students will view primary sources such as films and historical photographs, as well as read academic writings related to these sources and related themes.

No prerequisite.


JGJ360H1S - Holocaust in Literature

Tuesday 10 - 12 pm 

Instructor: TBA

This course examines literary works written in different languages, in ghettos and concentration camps during the Holocaust, as well as those reflecting on the genocide in its aftermath. We focus on literature as a means of engaging with the unimaginable and on the cross analysis of eye-witness and memory writing.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Exclusion: CJS220H1, GER367H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


CJS390H1S - Feminism and Jewish Orthodoxy in the 21st Century

Thursday 10 - 12 pm 

Instructor: Hannah Mayne

Orthodoxy is often associated with tradition from the past, static practices, illiberal approaches, and top-down authority. In this course, we will complicate these associations and assumptions by exploring the relationship between Jewish Orthodoxy and feminism. Our approach will be ethnographic. We will read the words of Jewish orthodox feminists, as well as opinion pieces, blogs, and interviews in popular media, alongside studies authored by anthropologists, sociologists, and social historians. The course is divided into two units. In Unit I we will survey some of the debates about the possibilities and limits of change within Jewish tradition. Unit II will then take us to sites and spaces in the Americas and in Israel where Orthodox Jewish women are engaged in activism and/or new ritual practices, in conversation with or in opposition to the feminist movement. Students do not need to have previous knowledge of Jewish Orthodoxy to take this course.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits


CJS392H1-F - Special Topics in Jewish Studies: Antisemitism in the Age of Covid-19

Thursday 2 - 4 pm 

Instructor: Joanna Krongold

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought into stark relief many of the inequalities and systemic forms of discrimination that plague our society. This interdisciplinary course will examine the fomentation of antisemitism in North America over the past two-and-a-half years. We will address topics such as the so-called Freedom Convoy’s use of Nazi slogans and images, anti-vaccine, anti-science, and anti-medical rhetoric, antisemitism in education, contemporary Holocaust distortion, and the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Together, we will explore historical precedents of antisemitism in order to carefully and thoughtfully consider its present-day manifestations from both the right and the left ends of the political spectrum. Students will be encouraged to situate antisemitism in broader political, literary, cultural, and medical contexts and to think critically about their own and others’ responses to insidious and overt forms of anti-Jewish discrimination. In doing so, we will collectively take stock of the association between antisemitism and COVID-19.

Breadth Requirement: None


CJS396H1F - Independent Study

A scholarly project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty affiliated with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CJS200H1 or CJS201H1 and permission from the Undergraduate Director.

Breadth Requirement: None.


CJS396H1S - Independent Study

A scholarly project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty affiliated with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CJS200H1 or CJS201H1 and permission from the Undergraduate Director.

Breadth Requirement: None.


CJS498Y1Y - Independent Study

A scholarly project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty affiliated with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CJS200H1 and permission of the Centre

Breadth Requirement: None.


CJS499HIF - Independent Study

A scholarly project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty affiliated with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CJS200H1 and permission of the Centre

Breadth Requirement: None.


CJS499H1S - Independent Study

A scholarly project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty affiliated with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Prerequisite: CJS200H1 and permission of the Centre

Breadth Requirement: None.

2022-2023 Courses

Below are the course offerings for the 2022-2023 academic year. 

DTS200Y1 - Introduction to Diaspora and Transnational Studies

Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm 

Instructor: Shternshis, A.

What is the relationship between place and belonging, between territory and memory? How have the experiences of migration and dislocation challenged the modern assumption that the nation-state should be the limit of identification? What effect has the emergence of new media of communication had upon the coherence of cultural and political boundaries? All of these questions and many more form part of the subject matter of Diaspora and Transnational Studies. This introductory course ex-amines the historical and contemporary movements of peoples and the complex issues of identity and experience to which these processes give rise as well as the creative possibilities that flow from movement and being moved. The area of study is comparative and interdisciplinary, drawing from the social sciences, history, the arts and humanities. Accordingly, this course provides the background to the subject area from diverse perspectives and introduces students to a range of key debates in the field, with particular attention to questions of history, globalization, cultural production and the creative imagination.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Society and its Institutions (3)


DTS300H1S - Qualitative and Quantitative Reasoning

Thursday 10 am - 12 pm 

Instructor: Scanlan, P.

Focuses on research design and training in methods from history, geography, anthropology, literary and cultural studies, and other disciplines appropriate to Diaspora and Transnational Studies. Prepares students to undertake primary research required in senior seminars.

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: The Physical and Mathematical Universes (5)


DTS402H1S - Advanced Topics in Diaspora and Transnationalism: Becoming Refugees

Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm 

Instructor: Schulz, M.

Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including DTS200Y1

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


DTS405H1F -  Advanced Topics in Diaspora and Transnationalism: Superman and Other Migrants

Monday 1 - 3 pm

Instructor: Seidman, N.

Content in any given year depends on instructor.

Prerequisite: 14.0 credits including DTS200Y1

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

RLG107H1S - "It's the End of the World as We Know It"

Wednesday 1 - 3 pm

Instructor: Maxwell Kennel

Throughout history, many religious movements have envisioned the end of the world. This course will explore the ways in which different religious movements have prepared for and expected an end time, from fears, symbols, and rituals to failed prophecies and social violence. By examining traditions such as Jewish and Christian apocalyptic texts through to fears of nuclear apocalypse and zombies, the course seeks to understand the ways in which ancient and modern claims of “the end” reflect the aspirations, anxieties, and religious concerns of communities.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (2)


RLG195H1F - Alt-Bible: What Could Have Been

Tuesday 1 - 3 pm

Instrictor: John Marshall

Why does our contemporary Bible not include any daughters for Adam and Eve or any stories of Jesus as a young boy? What if Enoch was more prominent than Moses or Thomas more prominent than Paul? "The Bible" that we have is not a single book or a simple collection, but something that has grown over time, been the object of contention and argument, and has sometimes been a common ground across traditions. We examine side-by-side writings that have become canonical and writings that once held authority but have not found widespread canonical status, and strive to understand the processes by which we ended up with "the Bible" we have today. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/CNR option.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


RLG202H1S - Judaism 

Monday 2 - 4 pm and Wednesday 2 - 3 pm

Instructor: Robert Gibbs

An introduction to the religious tradition of the Jews that explores key themes as they change from ancient times to today. The set of themes will include: the Sabbath, Study, Place, Household, Power. Each year will focus on one theme. We will read holy texts, modern literature, history, ethnography, and philosophy, covering each theme in a range of genres and across the diverse span of Jewish experience.

Exclusion: RLG202H5, RLG202Y1

Recommended Preparation: RLG100Y1/RLG200H1/RLG208Y1

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (2)


RLG209H1S - Justifying Religious Belief

Friday 12 - 2 pm 

Instructor: Sol Goldberg 

A survey course that introduces students to a range of epistemological and ethical issues in the study of religion. The issues include: the justification of religious belief; the coherence of atheism; reason vs. faith; the nature of religious language; religious pluralism, exclusivism, and inclusivism.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) 


RLG233H1S - Religion and Popular Culture

Friday 10 am - 1 pm 

Instructor: Jennifer Harris 

A course on the interactions, both positive and negative, between religion and popular culture. We look at different media (television, advertising, print) as they represent and engage with different religious traditions, identities, and controversies.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


RLG303H1F - Evil and Suffering

Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Sol Goldberg

The existence of evil poses a problem to theistic beliefs and raises the question as to whether a belief in a deity is incompatible with the existence of evil and human (or other) suffering. This course examines the variety of ways in which religions have dealt with the existence of evil.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG313H1F - Love, Sex, Family

Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructors: Alison Murphy

This course equips students to understand the religious roots of modern formations of gender, sexuality, and kinship, focusing in particular on Judaism, Christianity, and New Religious Movements. Topics we will cover include: the transformation of traditional religious structures into the modern #religion of romantic love,” the reshaping of religious practices within the modern nuclear family and its gendered division of labour, the persistent religious entanglements within not only normative but also queer and transgressive gender performances and kinship structures, the political asymmetries within which different religious modernities emerge, and the role of literature in preserving religious enchantment in modernity.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


RLG321H1F - Women and the Hebrew Bible

Tuesday 3 - 5 pm 

Instructor: Nyasha Junior

This course provides a critical examination of the Hebrew Bible (sometimes called the Old Testament) with an emphasis on women characters. It examines the historical and literary contexts of Hebrew Bible texts and engages diverse methods of contemporary biblical scholarship with particular attention to issues of gender. All readings will be in English. No knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG325H1S - The Uses and Abuses of the Bible

Monday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Judith Newman

From politics to popular culture, the Bible has shaped people and nations for good and for ill. This course introduces the Jewish and Christian Bibles and considers case studies of how biblical texts have been interpreted. The Bible has been used to bolster slavery and white supremacy and to inspire political liberation movements. It has been used to justify annihilation of Indigenous people by Christian colonists yet given hope to Jews that next year in Jerusalem might be better. How can the same #book” be used for such different purposes? This course focuses on the cultural and political consequences of biblical interpretation. An underlying premise is that the Bible is not static but is rather a nomadic text as it is continuously interpreted in ways that sometimes contribute to human flourishing, but also can result in violence, human diminishment, or death.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG327H1S - Hospitality and Ethics in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructor: Harry Fox

Refugee crises in modern times have raised questions concerning what degree of hospitality is owed the stranger or foreigner whose motivation is a new, safe, and secure home rather than being treated as a guest passing through on a time-limited visa. Jacques Derrida"s ideas of both conditional hospitality (e.g., tourists) and unconditional hospitality (e.g., strangers) need to be explored from the perspective of philosophical and ethical traditions including Jewish, Christian, and Muslim ethics.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG332H1S - Reasonable and Radical Hope

Tuesday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Sol Goldberg

Human beings have a natural and necessary interest in the prospects of their happiness, their moral improvement, and a progressively more just world. When, to what extent, and on what basis our hope for these things could be reasonable have been central questions in philosophy of religion since the Enlightenment. But genocides and cultural devastation (e.g., the Holocaust or the fates of some Indigenous communities) have compelled more recent philosophers to ask not only about rational hope, but also radical hope. This course explores reasonable and radical hope, first by unpacking the well-established philosophical question of our what we may reasonably expect from ourselves and our world, and then turning to the issue of humans"!capacity to persist when their community and its culture face extinction, i.e., when they may no longer expect anything.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG338H1S - Religion and Religiosity in Israel/Palestine

Thursday 4 - 6 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri

Focusing on present-day Israel/Palestine, this interdisciplinary course is intended for students interested in exploring a wide range of theoretical questions and examining their applicability to the study of sites, texts, rituals, and politics in the region. We will address the history of the land's consecration from Jewish, Christian, and Muslim perspectives. Students will analyze specific sites associated with religious congregations and ritual practices, and study them within their local and regional contexts. Looking at the complex relationships between religious- political movements and institutions within Jewish and Muslim societies, we will delve into various attempts to secularize (and theologize) Jewish and Palestinian communities and their discontents. Rather than providing the typical emphasis on conflict, the course is a journey into the history and present of the land and its diverse communities.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


RLG341H1F - Dreaming of Zion: Exile and Return in Jewish Thought

Wednesday 10 am- 12 pm

Instructor: Kenneth Green

An inquiry into the theme of exile and return in Judaism, often called the leading idea of Jewish religious consciousness. Starting from Egyptian slavery and the Babylonian exile, and culminating in the ideas of modern Zionism, the course will examine a cross-section of Jewish thinkers--ancient, medieval, and modern.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG342H1F - Judaism in the Early Modern Era

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Kenneth Green

The development and range of modern Jewish religious thought from Spinoza, Mendelssohn and Krochmal, to Cohen, Rosenzweig and Buber. Responses to the challenges of modernity and fundamental alternatives in modern Judaism.

Exclusion: RLG342Y1

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG343H1S - Kabbala: A History of Mystical Thought in Judaism

Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructor: Kenneth Green

A historical study of the Kabbala and the mystical tradition in Judaism, with emphasis on the ideas of Jewish mystical thinkers and movements.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG346H1F - Time and Place in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Thursday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructor: Harry Fox

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam each have their own sets of prayer times, frequency of prayers and their locations such as home, synagogue, temple, church or mosque. They have completely different calendrical systems. Holiness is also connected to geographical locations, which often serve as destinations of pilgrimage. This course will examine linear and cyclical times and the concepts of holiness in time and place by looking at primary sources in translation. We will investigate the persistence of holy places, how their names continue, and how gender issues are part of the jurisdictional politics of disputes over place and time.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


RLG433H1S - Maimonides and His Modern Interpreters

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Kenneth Green

An introduction to The Guide of the Perplexed by Moses Maimonides, and to some of the basic themes in Jewish philosophical theology and religion. Among topics to be considered through close textual study of the Guide: divine attributes; biblical interpretation; creation versus eternity; prophecy; providence, theodicy, and evil; wisdom and human perfection. Also to be examined are leading modern interpreters of Maimonides.

Exclusion: POL421H1

Prerequisite: Completion of 9.0 credits

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


JRN301H1F Disability in the Hebrew Bible and Related Texts

Monday 2 pm - 4 pm

Instructor: Jeremy Schipper

The Hebrew Bible (sometimes called the Old Testament) has influenced ideas about disability in societies across the globe for thousands of years. Yet, notions of disability in the Hebrew Bible may be strikingly different from what we might imagine. This course explores how some biblical texts and related ancient literature conceptualize disability in relation to issues of ethnicity, sexuality, beauty, age, social class, religious expression and so on. We will examine a number of these issues both in their ancient context and in some more recent interpretations of the Hebrew Bible. All readings will be in English. No knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Breadth Requirements: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

 


JCA302H1S The Bible and the Big Bang

Tuesday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructor: A. Hincks

The origin of the Universe is addressed both by current physical cosmology and by religious interpretations of the Bible. This course explores how these approaches to the cosmos’s origins differ and how they might be mutually informative. Core concepts in each domain will be examined and definitions carefully distinguished (e.g., ‘nothing’, ‘cause’, ‘matter’): topics will include the question of temporal beginnings (scientific theories of spontaneous creation or an eternal universe vis-à-vis the doctrine of creation from nothing) and the problem of cosmic fine tuning (the multiverse vis-à-vis the idea of divine intervention).

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 credits

Recommended Preparation: AST101H1/ AST201H1/ AST121H1/ AST221H1/ AST222H1, SMC232H1/ CHC232H1

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


MHB155H1F Elementary Modern Hebrew I

Tuesday and Friday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri

Introduction to the fundamentals of Hebrew grammar and syntax. Emphasis on the development of oral and writing skills.

Exclusion: Grade 4 Hebrew (or Grade 2 in Israel)/ NML155H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


MHB156H1S Elementary Modern Hebrew II

Tuesday and Friday 11 am - 1pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri

Introduction to the fundamentals of Hebrew grammar and syntax. Emphasis on the development of oral and writing skills.

Exclusion: Grade 4 Hebrew (or Grade 2 in Israel)/ NML156H1

Prerequisites: MHB155H1/ NML155H1 permission of the instructor based on previous language knowledge

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


MHB255H1F Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Tuesday and Friday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri

Intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: Grade 8 Hebrew (or Ulpan level 2 in Israel)/ NML255Y1

Prerequisites: MHB156H1/ NML156H1 or permission of the instructor based on previous language knowledge

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


MHB256H1S Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Tuesday and Friday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri

Continued intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: Grade 8 Hebrew (or Ulpan level 2 in Israel)/ NML255Y1

Prerequisites: MHB255H1/ NML156H1 or permission of the instructor based on previous language knowledge

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

 


MHB355H1F Advanced Modern Hebrew I

Monday and Thursday 11 am - 1pm

Instructor: TBA

Advanced intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: OAC Hebrew/ NML355Y1

Prerequisites: MHB256H1/ NML255Y1 or permission of the instructor based on previous language knowledge

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

ENV330H1S - Waste Not: Faith-Based Environmentalism

Wednesday 10 am - 12 pm 

Instructor: Yoreh, T.

This course explores religious environmentalism, its proponents and opponents, and its core values within the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Religious environmentalists have used teachings from sacred texts as exemplars of sustainability. Some, however, claim that these texts teach domination, anthropocentrism and hierarchical values. Looking at a range of worldviews, we focus on the topics of wastefulness, consumption, and simplicity. Readings about barriers, motivations, and values that inform environmental behaviour are complemented with field trips to places of worship where we will hear religious leaders speak about the environmental initiatives undertaken in their communities and see sacred spaces.

Prerequisite: Completion of 8.0 FCE including ENV221H1/ ENV222H1; or permission of the Undergraduate Associate Director

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

EUR300H1-S - Minorities in Ukraine during the 20th and 21st Centuries

Wednesdays 10 am -12 pm

Instructor: Anna Shternshis

The course examines history and culture of Jews, Crimean Tatars, Poles, Armenians and Russians who lived in Ukraine of the 20th and 21st century. The focus is on literary and artistic work, oral histories, ethnographies and music, analyzed as both artistic texts and historical commentaries.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

GER260Y1Y - Elementary Yiddish

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 12 - 1 pm 

Instructor: TBA

This course introduces Yiddish language, literature, music, theater, and cinema through interactive multi-media seminars, designed to build proficiency in reading, writing and comprehending. No prior knowledge of Yiddish is required.

Exclusion: GER463Y1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


GER275H1F - Marx, Nietzsche, Freud

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm 

Instructor: Willi Goetschel

This is an introductory course to the thought of Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Sigmund Freud and their pioneering contributions to the understanding of the individual and society in modernity. Readings include selections from writings of the early Marx, the Communist Manifesto, and Capital, Nietzsche's critique of culture, academe, and nationalism, and Freud's theory of culture, his views on the psychopathology of everyday life, on the meaning of dreams, symptoms, the return of the repressed, and what it might mean to live in a free society.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


GER360H1F - Intermediate Yiddish

Wednesday 12-1 pm and Friday 12-2 pm 

Instructor: TBA

The course conducted in Yiddish offers a review of basic grammar, stylistics, study of short literary texts.

Exclusion: GER463Y1

Prerequisite: GER260Y1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


GER361H1F Yiddish Literature in Translation (E)

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm 

Instructor: TBA

An overview of the major figures and tendencies in modern Yiddish literature and culture from the beginning of the 19th century to the present. Readings (in English) of modern Yiddish prose, poetry, drama and cinema.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


GER460H1S - Advanced Yiddish

Wednesday 12-1 pm and Friday 12-2 pm

Instructor: TBA

This course conducted entirely in Yiddish focuses on advanced reading, writing, vocabulary and conversation, the study of poetry, short fiction, and memoir literature by leading authors. Selected advanced grammatical topics are presented in conjunction with the study of texts.

Exclusion: GER462H1

Prerequisite: GER360H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

HIS196H1S - Religion and Violence

Wednesday 10 am-12 pm

Instructor: Doris Bergen

In this seminar we will explore the complex roles of religion in cases of extreme violence. Working chronologically backward from the 1990s (Rwanda, former Yugoslavia), we will consider cases from a number of locations and decades in the 20th Century (Cambodia in the 1970s, the Holocaust in the 1940s, Armenians in the 1910s, Southwest Africa in the 1900s). Rather than limiting ourselves to the recent past, we will also explore cases from the 19th century (imperialism) and earlier as well as ongoing situations that connect past and present (aboriginal people in the Americas). Students will be expected to do the assigned reading (from personal accounts, primary sources, and scholarly articles), participate actively in discussions, prepare a series of short responses, make and oral presentation individually or with a group, and produce a final paper based on original research. Restricted to first-year students. Not eligible for CR/NCR option.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS330H1F - Germany from Frederick the Great to the First World War

Monday 11am- 1pm

Instructor: James Retallack

This survey course on Germany in the “long nineteenth century” begins by illuminating the relatively unchanging rhythms of everyday life in pre-modern Europe. It ends in a very different age -- when motorcars and trams rumbled through the streets of huge cities, when German battleships prowled the North Sea and Zeppelins hovered above Lake Constance, when Nobel Prize-winning scientists were the envy of the world, when Expressionism was exploding artistic conventions, and when new ideas about race and eugenics were emerging. Did Otto von Bismarck’s invocation of “blood and iron” in 1862 epitomize Germany’s transition to modern times? Or should we look to other developments to understand how the Germany of Goethe and Schiller became the Germany of Hitler and the Holocaust? Several themes are highlighted: social conflict, confessional division, regional diversity, the women’s movement, and political battles that contributed to both polarization and stalemate. Audio-visual materials are featured in every lecture. And students will have access to a vast array of images and primary documents (in translation) on the public website of the German Historical Institute, Washington, D.C. Discussion of these sources will be integrated into lectures.

Exclusion: HIS341Y1

Prerequisite: 1.0 HIS credit at the 100- or 200-level excluding HIS262H1

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS338H1F - The Holocaust, to 1942 (formerly HIS338Y1/398Y1)

Friday 10 am - 12 pm

Instructor: Doris Bergen

This is the first of two linked courses on the Holocaust, the program of mass killing carried out under the leadership of Nazi Germans during World War II. Destruction of Jews occupied the centre of Nazi ideology and practice. Accordingly, this course will examine varieties of antisemitism in Europe; German policies against Jews from 1933 to 1939; the expansion of terror with war and conquests in 1939, 1940, and 1941; and Jewish responses to persecution and extreme violence. Particular attention will be paid to how the Nazi assault on Jews connected with attacks against other people within Germany and, after 1939, in German-occupied Europe: people deemed disabled, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Afro-Germans, Sinti and Roma, homosexuals, Poles, and Soviet prisoners of war. The approach will be chronological, up to the end of 1941/ beginning of 1942.

Exclusion: HIS388Y1/HIS398Y1/HIS338H5.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6 undergraduate FCEs.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS353Y1Y - Poland: A Crossroads of Europe

Tuesday 9-11 am

Instructor: Piotr Wróbel

The course will survey the history of Poland as “melting pot” and as a borderland between Western and Eastern Europe. The course will analyze the political and social history of Poland in its Central European context and will discuss the consequences of Christianization, the Polish- Lithuanian Union, the Partitions, two World Wars and the communist era.

Prerequisite: HIS251Y1/permission of the instructor

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS361H1S - The Holocaust, from 1942

Friday 10 am - 12 pm 

Instructor: Doris Bergen

This is the second of two linked courses on the Holocaust, the program of mass killing carried out under the leadership of Nazi Germans during World War II. In this course, we will continue with a chronological approach, starting with 1942, a year that marked both the peak of German military power and a massive escalation in the murder of Jews. Particular attention will be paid to the connections between the war and the Holocaust throughout the years 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945. Issues to be addressed include resistance by Jews and non-Jews; local collaboration; the roles of European governments, the Allies, the churches, and other international organizations; and varieties of Jewish responses. The last part of the course will focus on postwar repercussions of the Holocaust in justice, memory and memorialization, and popular culture.

Exclusion: HIS338Y1/HIS361H5.

Prerequisite: Completion of 6 undergraduate FCEs and HIS 338H1.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS364H1F - From Revolution to Revolution: Hungary Since 1848

Wednesday 9 - 11 am 

Instructor: Robert Austin 

This course offers a chronological survey of the history of Hungary from the 1848 revolution until the present. It is ideal for students with little or no knowledge of Hungarian history but who possess an understanding of the main trends of European history in the 19th and 20th centuries. The focus is on the revolutions of 1848-1849, 1918-1919, the 1956 Revolution against Soviet rule and the collapse of communism in 1989. The story has not been invariably heroic, violent and tragic.

Prerequisite: A 100 level HIS course

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS407H1F - Imperial Germany, 1871-1918

Monday 2-4 pm

Instructor: James Retallack

Historiographical controversies and the latest empirical findings concerning social conflict and political mobilization under Bismarck and Wilhelm II. Problems raised by competing schools of interpretation include definitions of the authoritarian state, bourgeois hegemony, localism and regionalism, radical nationalism, workers 'culture, and gender relations. (Joint undergraduate- graduate)

Exclusion: HIS407H5

Prerequisite: HIS330H1 or permission of the instructor

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS433H1S - Polish Jews Since the Partition of Poland

Thursday 9 - 11 am 

Instructor: Piotr Wróbel

To explore the history of Polish Jews from the Partitions of Poland to the present time, concentrating on the 19th and the first half of the 20th centuries: situation of Polish Jews in Galicia; Congress Kingdom of Poland; Prussian-occupied Poland before 1914; during World War II; and post-war Poland. Focus on an analysis of primary sources. (Joint undergraduate-graduate)

Prerequisite: HIS208Y1/HIS251Y1/permission of the instructor

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS444H1S - Topics in History: War, Genocide, and Occupation: Jewish Experience and the Military History of WWII

Thursday 6 - 8 pm 

Instructor: Connor Sebestyen

This fourth-year seminar aims to introduce students to the discipline of military history and explore its multifaceted relationship with Holocaust history. Jews were not only victims of genocide – this course will examine the roles and experiences of Jewish men and women who served in the Allied armies both during the war and during the occupation.  This course will show how understanding the military history of the Second World War is crucial to understanding the progression, implementation, and memory of the Holocaust. A key focus will be how military service affected Jewish communities and Jewish identities all over the world  and how genocide related to Axis and Allied war planning at different stages of the war. Students will develop an original research project using primary and secondary sources.

Prerequisite: A course in modern European or Jewish history

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


HIS496H1F - Topics in History: Weimar and Nazi Germany: How Do Democracies Die?

Monday 10 am- 12 pm

Instructor:Jennifer Jenkins

Does the destruction of Germany’s first democratic republic provide a map for how democracies die? What lessons can Germany’s history provide for our current political moment? This seminar on Weimar and National Socialist Germany analyzes the transition from democracy to dictatorship between the German Revolution of 1918 and the building of the Nazi state between 1933 and 1938. How was democracy introduced in Germany after the First World War? What were its challenges? Who were its defenders? In what ways was Weimar a failing state after 1929, and what did this mean for the country’s institutions?

In analyzing the country’s movement from democracy to dictatorship an interdisciplinary variety of texts will be studied, covering topics from political violence and economic instability to the languages of civil society and the importance of trust/solidarity in a democratic polity. We will ask the question of whether the Weimar Republic failed or was destroyed, and how the National Socialist dictatorship arose from its collapse.

Prerequisite: 14.0 FCE including 2.0 HIS credits. Further prerequisites vary from year to year, consult the department.

NMC104H1F - The Biblical World

Online Asynchronous 

Instructor: Holmstedt, R.

Examine the history, lands, peoples, religions, literatures and cultures that produced the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Topics to be covered include an overview of the geography and history of Ancient Israel and Judea, the role of the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek languages, the literary genres reflected in biblical and some contemporary non-biblical texts, and the scholarly methods by which the Bible is studied.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NMC252H1S - Hebrew Bible

Online Synchronus on Wednesday 4-5 pm 

Instructor: Holmstedt, R.

An introduction to the critical study of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament and the related literature of ancient Jewish communities (Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, Dead Sea Scrolls). English translations used; no knowledge of Hebrew is required.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC284H1F - Judaism and Feminism: Legal Issues from Menstruation to Ordination

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm 

Instrucrtor: Meacham, T.

Agitation for change exists in religious practice worldwide in areas of access, status, inclusion, and egalitarianism. Traditional religion is often in conflict with egalitarian modernity. This sometimes results in difficulties with religious identification. This course will explore the interaction between feminism and Judaism. We will examine how Jewish law (halakhah) sometimes conflicts with ideas of egalitarianism particularly in legal disabilities for women such as divorce, lack of access to high-level Torah study, and discrimination in public religious roles. The traditional exemption of women from the obligation of Torah study had great impact on women"s religious responsibility and status. Various movements within Judaism competed in efforts to resolve these difficulties. In this course we will consider to what extent inclusion and egalitarianism have become complementary to traditional Judaism.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC320H1S Aramaic Bible Translations

Tuesday 12 - 3 pm

Instructor: Meacham, T.

Selected texts in the Pentateuch beginning with narrative section in Genesis chapter 3 (Garden of Eden), followed by the legal sections in Deuteronomy 25 (levirate marriage) and Exodus 21 (abortion) will be studied using the following Targumim: Onkelos, Pseudo- Jonathan, and Neofiti. The Samaritan (transliterated into Hebrew letters) will be collated as additional references. Midrashic sources of Pseudo-Jonathan and Neofiti will be discussed. A comparative study of the Targumim will be made in reference to grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and translation strategies. Solid background in Biblical or Modern Hebrew, or Introductory Aramaic or experience with Eastern Aramaic from the Babylonian Talmud is required. Students will be taught to use the Comprehensive Aramaic Lexicon and become familiar with the relevant dictionaries and grammars.


NMC351H1S Dead Sea Scrolls

Thursday 1 - 3 pm

Instrucrtor: Metso, S.

This course provides an examination of the historical and cultural context in which the Dead Sea Scrolls were authored and copied, the types of writings included in the Scrolls, and the ancient Jewish groups behind these texts. It also discusses the significance of the Scrolls for understanding the textual development of the Hebrew Bible, ancient scriptural interpretation, and the thought world of the Jews during the period that gave birth to both Rabbinic Judaism and early Christianity. No knowledge of Hebrew or Aramaic is required. (Offered alternate years)

Prerequisite: 9.0 FCE

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NMC384H1S Legal Issues and Personal Status in Judaism: Constructions of Sexes, Genders, and Sexualities in Rabbinic Literature

Thursday 12 - 2 pm

Instrucrtor: Meacham, T.

Gender Issues and Jewish Law in Spring 2023 will cover Constructions of Sexes, Genders, and Sexualities in Rabbinic Literature. We shall deal with legal and biological definitions of sex and intersex in classical Jewish writings from Bible through rabbinic literature, legal codes, and modern Jewish approaches, including biomedical ethics on sex assignment. We shall examine texts dealing with the legal definitions of sex acts and their legal repercussions. Constructions of the very different male and female genders and rabbinic attempts to categorize the gender of an intersex will be studied. We shall examine various sexual acts: heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, transsexual, intergenerational, and solitary sex in an attempt to discern the relationship of classical Jewish texts to them. Did these relationships constitute constructions of sexualities? The impact of cross-cultural influences on Jewish approaches to sex, gender, and sexuality will also be addressed.

Prerequisite: Completion of 4.0 FCE in Humanities/BR=1 or 2

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NMC386H1S - Muslims, Christians, and Jews in the Ottoman Empire

Tuesday 12 - 2 pm 

Instrucrtor: Methodieva, M.

Although ruled by a Muslim dynasty and frequently characterized as an Islamic empire, the Ottoman state was inhabited by diverse religious and ethnic populations, many of them non- Muslim. This course examines how the Ottoman Empire governed and organized its subjects, Muslims and non-Muslims alike, of various ethnic backgrounds. It explores the relations among these communities and their interactions with the state, raising questions about tolerance, co- existence, conflict, loyalty, and identity. By looking into a selection of topics from the wide territorial span of the Ottoman Empire (Anatolia, the Balkans, and the Arab Middle East) the course seeks to provide insights into the organization, functioning, and transformation of a multi- confessional state and society in the premodern and modern eras.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


NML155H1F - Elementary Modern Hebrew I

Tuesday and Friday 11 am - 1 pm 

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

See MHB155H1 in Religion.


NML156H1S - Elementary Modern Hebrew II

Tuesday and Friday 11 am - 1 pm 

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

See MHB156H1 in Religion.


NML250Y1Y - Introductory Biblical Hebrew

Monday and Wednesday 9-11 am

Instructor:  Laura Hare

An introduction to biblical Hebrew prose. Grammar and selected texts. For students with no previous knowledge of Hebrew.

Exclusion: Those who have completed Grade 8 Hebrew (or Grade 6 in Israel)

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML255H1F - Intermediate Modern Hebrew I

Tuesday and Friday 2 - 4 pm 

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

Intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: Those who have completed Grade 8 Hebrew (or Ulpan level 2 in Israel), MHB255H1

Prerequisite: MHB156H1/ NML156H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representation (1)


NML256H1S - Intermediate Modern Hebrew II

Tuesday and Friday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

Continued intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: Those who have completed Grade 8 Hebrew (or Ulpan level 2 in Israel), MHB256H1

Prerequisite: NML255H1/ MHB255H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representation (1)


NML350H1F - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I

Monday and Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Laura Hare

A continuation of the study of ancient Hebrew grammar and texts. Focus is given to covering a wide variety of genres, e.g., narrative, chronicle, genealogy, oracle, prayer, hymn, and proverb.

Prerequisite: NML250Y1 

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML351H1S - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II

Monday and Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Laura Hare

A continuation of the study of ancient Hebrew grammar and texts. Focus is given to covering a wide variety of genres, e.g., narrative, chronicle, genealogy, oracle, prayer, hymn, and proverb.

Prerequisite: NML350H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML355H1F - Advanced Modern Hebrew I

Monday and Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

Advanced intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: OAC Hebrew, MHB355H1

Prerequisite: MHB256H1/ NML256H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML356H1S - Advanced Modern Hebrew II

Monday and Thursday 11 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Yigal Nizri 

Continued advanced intensive study of written and spoken Hebrew.

Exclusion: OAC Hebrew, MHB356H1

Prerequisite: NML355H1/ MHB355H1

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


NML357H1S - Legends of the Jews (Aggadah): Midrash Aggadah

Wednesday 5-7 pm

Instructor: Fox, H.

This course is an introduction to the exegetical methods of the rabbinic sages in their analysis of biblical texts, with special attention to issues of intertextuality. After a quick overview of the genres of midrashic literature, we shall examine the midrashic methods used to transition from the biblical text to the midrash. Our main focus will be on Original Sin in the Garden of Eden and its repercussions. Our primary texts will be Bereishit Rabbah, Avot de Rabbi Natan, andAlphabeta deBen Sirah. We shall follow these midrashim in other midrash collections such as Midrash HaGadol, Tanhuma, Bereishit Rabbati, and Aggadat Bereishit. The motif of Original Sin has had significant reverberations in Judaism and Christianity and societies influenced by these traditions.

Prerequisite: Intermediate-level Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NML420Y1Y - Jerusalem Talmud

Wednesday 10 am - 1 pm

Instructor: Meacham, T.

This course introduces the student to the Jerusalem Talmud (y, Yerushalmi or Palestinian Talmud) which is the major amoraic legal compendium of the Land of Israel. Tractate Niddah has been chosen for representative study because of its unique situation as the only Talmudic Tractate in the Order of Purities and its evidence of the abrupt redaction and closure of the Tractate at the end of chapter 3. Recognition of the dialogic structure of the legal discussions concerning the Mishnah and its elucidation will be emphasized. Terminology, grammar and syntax of Western Aramaic will be learned with reference to parallels in the Babylonian Talmud. Use of the Bar Ilan Data Base and the Friedberg Jewish Manuscripts Project will be demonstrated.

We will begin with Chapter 3 of Tractate Niddah which deal with spontaneous abortion, definitions of personhood of the fetus, uncertain products of conception, intersex fetuses and fetuses of indeterminate sex, fetal development and fetal malformations, and normal and breech births. Solid background in Biblical or Modern Hebrew is required.

Prerequisite: Intermediate-level Hebrew (Modern or Biblical)

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1), Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)


NML456H1F Modern Hebrew Prose

Wednesday 5 - 7 pm

Instructor: Fox, H.

This course is designed to introduce advanced students of Modern Hebrew to modern prose written primarily in today"s state of Israel. To this end we will spend two weeks looking at the motifs and styles available in contemporary children"s literature with an eye to their use of biblical allusions. This serves as background to a study of short stories by the Nobel laureate Agnon. The sources of the stories will be studied from the perspective of intertextuality where the source is both inspirational and in turn explicated by the novelist. The use of online search engines and databases will facilitate this analysis. The course teaches advanced reading skills in prose literature in Hebrew with emphasis on interpreting the texts, close readings, and tracking allusions. Use will be made of historical Hebrew dictionaries.

Prerequisite: High Intermediate-level Modern Hebrew

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

PHL315H1S - Topics in 17th and 18th Century Philosophy

Tuesday 3 - 6 pm

Instructor: Stang, N.

This is a course on classical German idealism (from Kant to Hegel) which takes as its starting point the seismic impact of F.H. Jacobi’s book 1785 book On the Doctrine of Spinoza and the ensuing ‘pantheism dispute.’ In that book, Jacobi poses a dilemma for philosophy: either it embraces reason and leads to Spinozism (tantamount to necessitarianism, fatalism, and atheism, according to Jacobi) or it subordinates reason to faith in free will, morality, and the existence of God. We will then read German idealism as a series of responses to Jacobi’s either/or. We’ll start with a crash-course in Spinoza’s metaphysics (Ethics Parts I–II), then read Jacobi, as well as his polemic with Moses Mendelssohn, who tries to uphold classical pre-Kantian rationalist metaphysics while avoiding Spinozism/pantheism. We will then turn to Reinhold, who popularized Kant’s philosophy by presenting it as a third way between the poles of Jacobi’s dilemma. Next we will examine how Fichte and Schelling incorporate Spinozistic elements into their own philosophy, while maintaining a role for the freedom and teleology denied by Spinoza. We will conclude with Hegel’s argument that Spinozism/pantheism entails acosmism (it denies the existence of the finite) and that the only solution to acosmism is his dialectical logic.

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief, and Behaviour (2)


PHL322H1F - Contemporary Continental Philosophy

Tuesday 5 - 8 pm 

Instructor: William Paris

German and French philosophy after World War II, focusing on such topics as: debates about humanism, hermeneutics, critical theory, the structuralist movement, its successors such as deconstruction. Typical authors: Heidegger, Gadamer, Habermas, Levi-Strauss, Foucault, Derrida.

Exclusion: PHL324H5

Prerequisite: PHL217H1, 7.5 courses (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2) 


PHL338H1F - Jewish Philosophy

Tuesday and Thursday 12-1:30 pm

Instructor: Michael Rosenthal

A selection of texts and issues in Jewish philosophy, for example, Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed, Buber's The Prophetic Faith, prophecy and revelation, Divine Command and morality, creation and eternity, the historical dimension of Jewish thought.

Prerequisite: 7.5 FCE (in any field) with at least 1.5 in philosophy

Breadth Requirement: Thought, Belief and Behaviour (2)

POL377H1S - Topics in Comparative Politics I: Israel"s Modern Tribes

Tuesday 4 - 6 pm 

Instructor: Oded Oron

In June 2015, Israel’s President Reuven Rivlin gave a speech at the annual Herzliya Conference discussing the social and political schisms in modern Israeli society. Rivlin detailed the changes to Israel’s population makeup and how it could harbinger severe economic and social issues that will threaten the future of the Jewish state and bring about a “new Israeli order”. This course reviews and analyzes the characteristics, political, and social transformation experienced by each group and how it fits into the fabric of Israeli society. Over the years winds of change and collective claims stirred the Israeli “melting pot” and created new realities that exposed early societal cleavages. Throughout the course students will gain a deep understanding of these core issues in modern Israel by analyzing the socio-political cleavages as well as opportunities for integration and compromise between the “new tribes” that make up modern Israeli society.
Tags: State and Society, Israeli Politics, Social Movements

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)


POL378H1F - Topics in Comparative Politics II: Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Tuesday 4 - 6 pm 

Instructor: Oded Oron

The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the most intractable and multifaceted protracted conflicts in modern times with flare-ups of violence between its various actors continuing to claim lives and to threaten wider war. This course will survey the main political junctions in the conflict and will connect them to their reincarnations in contemporary times. We will study all of this, exploring the conflict’s many layers and relating it to broader International Relations and sociological concepts from the emergence of the conflict’s political fault lines during Ottoman times through the establishment of a Jewish state and its continued modern-day development. The course will include cultural products relating to both societies, including movies, clips, songs and forms of art and cultural representations.

Prerequisite: 1.0 credit in POL/ JPA/ JPF/ JPI/ JPR/ JPS/ JRA courses

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

SLA199H1F - Invisible Kingdom, Imaginary Space

Tuesday 1 - 3 pm

Instructor: TBA 

The Central European Region of Galicia gave rise to a remarkable array of literary representations -- Austrian, Jewish, Polish, and Ukrainian- animating fantastic creatures, powerful myths, deviant pleasures, and sublime stories. Bruno Schulz created shimmering peacocks, Leopold von Sacher-Masoch seized ecstasy through pain, and Ivan Franko investigated the effects of avarice and social decay.

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)


SLA268H1F - Cossacks!

Wednesday 2 - 4 pm

Instructor: TBA 

How are Cossacks depicted in literary and visual works? Were they the agents of a repressive Russian government, the hirelings of Polish kings, the tormentors of Eastern European Jews, the protectors of Europe from the Ottomans, or the liberators of the Ukrainian nation? We read works from the Jewish, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian cultural traditions.

Exclusion: CCR199H1 (First-Year Seminar: The Cossacks)

Breadth Requirement: Creative and Cultural Representations (1)

CDN280H1S - Canadian Jewish History

Thursday 12 - 2 pm

Instructor: TBA

This course focuses on initial settlement patterns of Jews in Toronto and elsewhere, community growth including suburbanization, and contemporary challenges such as anti-Semitism and assimilation.

Breadth Requirement: Society and its Institutions (3)

Additional Information 

Enrol in courses on ACORN.  The Faculty of Arts & Science offers more detailed instructions regarding how to enrol and on enrolment periods

Sessional dates are available on the Faculty of Arts & Science calendar.

See the Arts and Science timetable for courses with tutorials.  If there is conflicting information, the Arts & Science timetable takes priority. 

 

Course Archives 

The ATCJS Undergraduate Handbook contains all the essential information for the successful and memorable completion of an undergraduate degree with the Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies. In this handbook you will find the contact info for our departmental admin, an outline of the degree programs we offer and their requirements, and all FAS courses being offered that count towards a degree in Jewish Studies in the given academic year.

PDF iconATCJS Undergraduate Handbook 2021-2022.pdf

PDF iconATCJS Undergraduate Handbook 2020/2021 (pdf)

PDF iconATCJS Undergraduate Handbook 2019-2020.pdf

PDF iconATCJS Undergraduate Handbook 2018-2019.pdf